Hirshron Irish Soul Cakes by Heather Jane Metcalf

Original Graphic by Heather Jane Metcal Soul Cakes are connected to the origins of trick or treating. After the Christianization of Scottland and Irland, the church adopted the concept of food for spirits among other customs, however always adding a twist of their own. In the multiple extents taken to graph new Christian traditions onto … Continue reading Hirshron Irish Soul Cakes by Heather Jane Metcalf

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Mupitsl(Moo-Peetz): Cannibal-Owl-Monsters of Comanche Folklore and Paranormal Preparedness in Indigenous Storytelling

PREY MOVIE SPOILER WARNING: Official Prey movie poster by Matt Ferguson As someone who grew up with the Predator, I was interested to hear that a new sequel to the series was in the works. As someone with Indigenous heritage (Tewa/Tiwa) and a cultural connection to traditional communities (Genízaro/Mexica), I was excited to learn that … Continue reading Mupitsl(Moo-Peetz): Cannibal-Owl-Monsters of Comanche Folklore and Paranormal Preparedness in Indigenous Storytelling

Haunted History of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

San Miguel de Allende is a colonial era city in Guanajuato, Mexico. It's small, with cobblestone roads, beautiful buildings, and amazing food. It's also full of legends and myths. Before visiting San Miguel de Allende in June of 2021 we reached out to our Primas at Espooky Tails Podcast for our paranormal preparation. They helped … Continue reading Haunted History of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

Nazis, Frauds, and Grifters: The Truth About The Lovette-Cunningham Incident: By Heidi Beedle

"Pale Rider" Bill Cooper The midst of a global pandemic is a perfect time to catch up on TV shows. With just about everything other than “essential businesses” closed there isn’t much to do except hunker down and binge-watch those shows you’ve been meaning to check out. I took the opportunity to finally watch the … Continue reading Nazis, Frauds, and Grifters: The Truth About The Lovette-Cunningham Incident: By Heidi Beedle

Exorcisms: Cross Cultural Approaches to Dealing with Energetic Parasites and Doorway Devils By Jason S. Cordova

Orbs captured by a baby monitor camera, associated with paranormal activity in the CSS Hollingsworth 2019 case. Possession is not just my favorite Sarah McLachlan song, but also a time-honored tradition of mischievous and malevolent entities. For the contemporary, Anglo-American, the concept of possession usually conjures images of Demons. Numerous pop culture references persist. Movies … Continue reading Exorcisms: Cross Cultural Approaches to Dealing with Energetic Parasites and Doorway Devils By Jason S. Cordova

Who Is La Llorona? Investigating a Cultural Haunting, By Jason S. Cordova

Immage by Heather Jane Metcalf La Llorona (the weeping woman) is a prominent folk legend among Chicano communities. She is described as a specter who cries and wails in the night, lamenting the loss of her children. She wears a filtering white dress and emits a strange translucent glow. She appears near likes, rivers, and … Continue reading Who Is La Llorona? Investigating a Cultural Haunting, By Jason S. Cordova

Black Magic Mayhem: By Jason Cordova

Follow the link for the full audio version of the podcast. Magic can take many forms. Even seemingly ordinary things can be viewed as magic when time is taken to appreciate them appropriately. Sunset is as magical as the whispers of the wind caring freshly fallen Autumn leaves. The song of a child laughing and … Continue reading Black Magic Mayhem: By Jason Cordova

The Phenomenon: A review of the new documentary by Jim Brown

“No one ever proved there is nothing to it. No one has had the opportunity to prove there is something to it.” Senator Harry Reid “…we are the norm and not the exception…we need to begin to prepare and accept that we are not alone in the universe…” Christopher Mellon, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of … Continue reading The Phenomenon: A review of the new documentary by Jim Brown

Indonesia’s Hobbits: Orang Pendek, Ebu Gogo, and Homo Floresiensis

The Cranium and mandible of Homo floresiensis. American Museum of Natural History Stories that tell of diminutive humanoid creatures, running the gamut from magical and spiritual to decidedly material in nature, are a widely dispersed feature of human folklore. Nowhere in the world however does the possibility of fiction maturing into fact hinge so precipitously … Continue reading Indonesia’s Hobbits: Orang Pendek, Ebu Gogo, and Homo Floresiensis